Sunshine in a bowl :Baby Pumpkin and Orange Puree for Halloween

Sunshine in a bowl for your baby ! Halloween is round the corner, so why not make a dish with the seasonal orange coloured vegetables and fruits, packed with B carotene and other nutrients you shouldn’t miss !

Puree

Ingredients

750g organic carrots, washed and diced (with the skin)
1 medium to large organic sweet potato peeled and diced(the smaller the better)
1/2 an orange (the juice)
1/2 a butternut squash or the equivalent in pumpkin/ winter squash, diced
1/2 pint of filtered water
1 chamomile teabag

Method: Take a pan of water, add the diced root vegetable and simmer; cook gently, and add the chamomile teabag; once starting to boil, simmer until the vegetables are soft enough but not mushy. Scoop out the vegetables and add a small portion of the juice; put into either a food processor or blender or puree to the desired texture. Place back in the pan with the rest of the liquid and gently warm again. Serve with half of a freshly squeezed orange juice.

Nutritional nugget
-Pumpkin makes a great baby food that’s loaded with vitamin A, C, E, and many other important nutrients
-Sweet potatoes are also a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin B6 and potassium . A very good source of vitamin A, C and manganese
-Squash is also a wonderful nutritious first food for you baby
-Chamomile is very relaxing and gentle on a baby’s tummy

You can use the pumpkin seeds for your own (adult) snacks or to top up your soups/salads, these are packed with fibre,mono-unsaturated fatty acids, protein and zinc amongst other vitamins and minerals.The latter of which we can be easily deficient of.

Look out for more mother and baby information and baby recipes in the near future.

Healthy skin starts from within

A diet that is healthy and well balanced will help support the functioning of our organs and metabolic processes that occur in the body, but also help nourish our skin inside and out.

Where specific skin conditions such as psoriasis, acne, eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, fungal skin rashes are concerned, I always aim to look at the root cause of the problem. Imbalances in hormones, immunity, digestion or inflammation often contribute to such skin concerns. The skin’s natural demand for nutrients is also increased when put under stress (for example: excessive inflammation of the skin requires further nutrients such as folic acid and protein).

Topical treatment is often not enough but targeted and individual support in your skincare routine, nutrition and overall wellbeing is required.

When necessary, I  recommend supplements that can either help support your skin and body’s defence mechanisms, speed up the healing process or help promote a glowing and youthful appearance

How can nutrition help ?

  • Support a poorly functioning digestion
  • Support collagen production
  • Identify allergies, intolerances and deficiencies
  • Prevent and slow down skin damage, leading to ageing
  • Support imbalances in hormones
  • Reduce the presence of underlying inflammation
  • Speed the healing process (for example :cold sores can be prevented and healed with a particular amino acid(building block of protein))

How can nutritional deficiencies affect the skin?

  • Lack of antioxidants (A, C, E) can affect the skin’s protection against the damaging UV rays.
  • Vitamin A deficiency can result in a disorder of the cells lining the inside of a hair follicle (aka hyperkeratinisation).This is turn can result in a reduction in sebaceous glands and also block our sweat glands. Long term deficiency in vitamin A also results in dry skin, fragile hair and hyperpigmentation.
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency is linked to skin hyperpigmentation, vitiligo, angular stomatitis (redness and fissures near the angles of the mouth) and hair changes .Deficiency in Vitamin B12, is often due to abnormal absorption.
  • Lacking essential fatty acids has shown to affect the skin’s permeability which in turn can lack moisture.
  • Kwashiokor is a form of malnutrition due to the lack of protein in the diet, causing swelling under the skin. Malnutrition is the primary causative factor, with others including deficiencies in zinc, essential fatty acids and alfatoxins (fungal toxins affecting certain types of crops).
  • Vitamin C deficiency also known as scurvy, is caused by the decreased production and increased fragility of collagen (collagen: protein that stops the ageing process). The skin can show early signs such as bruising, red or purple spots and thickening of the skin.
  • Deficiencies in zinc can cause poor wound healing, fragile or sparse hair, cause dermatitis (skin inflammation) to weep or even lead to secondary infections.

Get in touch to

  • Manage specific conditions
  • Simply promote a youthful glowing skin
  • Skin that is more resistant to signs of aging

 

On the 16th and 30th of September 2015 we will be offering a Skin Analysis Consultation for members of the Royal Automobile Club, followed by a 15 minute chat with me

 

 

Health concerns as we age

Ageing is an extremely complex, multifactorial process and there are many theories of its pathophysiology. It is a natural and gradual decline of our functional organ reserves to maintain the right balance, especially under conditions of stress (diet, lifestyle, medical history, family history, trauma, injuries, income, environment, and so on). It is believed that this loss of function can start as early as 30-40 years old, and decline at an annual rate of 1 %.

Particular concerns as we age and how to age gracefully while we support our health and wellbeing

  • Immune system: Natural decrease in our ability to fight disease .The immune system is directly linked to levels of inflammation in the body and as we age, our ability to turn off the natural inflammatory process is lost. When the body is subjected to poor lifestyle choices amongst other factors, the result is chronic inflammation. Over time this puts us at risk of developing atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes or alzheimer’s disease.
  • Endocrine system : Decline in thyroid function ,metabolism, energy levels, sex hormones and glucose tolerance. There is also a reduction in DHEA, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands from cholesterol. It stimulates and strengthens the immune system, aids dietary protein synthesis, helping the mood, optimum wellness and reducing food intolerances.DHEA also helps prevent osteoporosis.
  • Cardiovascular system : Thickening of arterial walls, decrease in  heart rate response to stress, and maximum heart rate. Our lifestyle, nutrition and weight as we age can further impact on the cardiovascular system.
  • Gastrointestinal system: Decrease in digestive enzymes, hydrochloric acid levels which support the breakdown of proteins, Vit B12, decrease in our liver’s ability to clear toxins and metabolise drugs as easily. The health of the gut also impacts on the immune system.
  • Nervous system: Cognitive decline made worst with chronic stress and low mood.
  • Musculoskeletal system: The body increases its bone mass until the mid 30’s after which a gradual loss begins. Genes decide on the bone shape and size, but mechanical stress by muscle, body weight, and physical activity influence the bone shape and density , and health throughout life. Other factors which contribute to osteoporosis include smoking, medication such as HRT, inadequate intakes of calcium, magnesium, boron, activity of weight bearing exercises.

Research shows that our relationship with food also changes as we age. Changes in appetite, loss of interest in preparing meals, social aspect of eating, gastrointestinal disturbances and therefore avoiding certain crucial nutrients or reducing the absorption of particular nutrients; chewing difficulties or changes in financial stability leading to less focus on healthy eating.

 

Principles associated with longevity

  • Regular balanced meals to avoid fluctuations in blood glucose levels and the stress hormone, cortisol. Be gentle on your digestion by eating 5 small meals daily
  • Moderate intake of stimulants (caffeine, alcohol, tobacco smoke, stress, sugar )which impact on cortisol levels, oxidative stress on the body and affect our balance of nutrients
  • Anti-inflammatory diet which includes herbs such as curcumin, ginger, boswellia, and omega 3 essential fatty acids from safe cold-water fish (3-5 servings/ week) , nuts (other than peanuts)  and  their respective milks, seeds, butters and oils, avocadoes etc.. Cook with fats (coconut oil, small amounts of organic butter or even small amounts of animal fat seldomly) which are resistant to heat and are not prone to oxidation ( destructive to our cells).Reduce your use of vegetable oils including canola, safflower, sunflower and corn oils, because they are heavily processed and oxidise upon heat.

Healthy fats also increase your levels of DHEA, our youth hormone !

  • Eat a rainbow of colours and maximise on vegetables, for their content of fibre, vitamins and minerals, and phytochemicals packed with antioxidants. The latter are naturally occurring compounds with disease prevention properties .

 

  • Your fibre intake should be 30-40g daily which would support healthy gastrointestinal health

 

  • Phytochemicals : Green tea , Blueberries, Bilberries, Dark Chocolate, Resvetrol found in grapes , protect the health of our cells from oxidation, retards the ageing process of the skin and protects against sunlight .These fight off inflammation as well.

 

  • Protein (focus on fish and vegetarian sources of protein), and less processed food. Be always wary of the label content. Protein requirements increase slightly with age to 1.0 to 1.25kg/kg. Protein helps to boost collagen production and will help you to keep a youthful appearance

 

  • Remain hydrated, with an approximate consumption of 2L of water daily (including herbal teas or coconut water). Electrolyte imbalance and dehydration is more common as we age as well as our thirst perception

 

  • Antioxidants– help protect the ageing body from the harmful effects of so-called free radicals – a type of highly reactive molecule which can destroy cell walls and lead to diseases such as cancer.
    • Glutathione : a naturally occurring protein that protects every cell, tissue, organ from toxic free radicals and disease. Made primarily in the liver, It is one of the most important antioxidants in the body. Older cells contain 20 to 30 % less glutathione than young cells !
    • Boost your levels with milk thistle; sulphur amino acids (from proteins found in eggs, meat, legumes ) and the amino acid glutamate (ripe tomatoes, walnuts, fish, turkey, rabbit, oats, barley)
    • Vitamin C , Selenium
    • Lutein (healthy vision) (kale, spinach broccoli) and lycopene (tomatoes)
    • Carotenoids (yellow and orange fruit and vegetables)

 

  • Take regular exercise which suits your ability, age and interest. Thus increasing the production of the hormone DHEA, glutathione levels, endorphins .Weight bearing exercise also enables you to lay down as much bone as possible during growth and keep as much as you can later on, preventing conditions like osteoporosis

 

  • Intakes of calcium (cruciferous vegetables, sesame seeds, dairy products )and adequate vitamin D levels should be kept in check regularly.

 

  • Stress reduction measures on a daily basis may include meditation, breath work, bio-energetic exercises (qi gong or tai chi), yoga, pilates, spiritual practises, adequate amounts of sleep, (8-10hours daily

 

  • Strong family and community ties

 

  • Last but not least : Be happy!

Irresistible Avocadoes

I’d like to share with you my love for avocadoes. If you are not an avocado lover yet, you may now be. Full of oleic acid, fibre, vitamin E, and packed with anti-oxidants. It has a rejuvenating effect on your body. It gives you beautiful complexion (besides being anti-ageing) and keeps your hair luscious which men just love! With the right type of fat it contains, it will keep your hearts healthy for donkey years. It is an incredible fruit; containing over 20 vitamins and minerals.
Food for thought: Ayurvedic vaidyars consider avocadoes to be anti vata and anti kapha; therefore if occasionally you suffer from dry skin or joint aches, avocado is the remedy for you. It moisturises dry hair and moistens dry lungs. It is a builder of ‘ojas’, hence it is wonderful as baby food! With its high content of electrolytes as well as containing calcium and magnesium, it is crucial for muscle functioning and balance, making it ideal for you to re-fuel after your TRX or HITT sessions or bodypump classes!You name it !

Have your avocadoes on toast, in smoothies, in salads, as a side guacamole or in a chocolate mousse below !
Nutrient breakdown per half avocado:
• Protein } 1/2 avocado contains 2g protein
• Fibre } 1/2 avocado contains 7g fiber
• Healthy fats } 1/2 avocado contains 15g fat
• Vitamins :Vitamin C } 17% DV; Vitamin E } 10% DV ;Vitamin K } 26% DV ; Folate } 20% DV ;B6 } 13% DV ; B5 } 14% DV
• Minerals : Magnesium } 7% DV ;Potassium } 14% DV; Copper } 9% DV ;Manganese } 7% DV

Dark Chocolate and Avocado Mousse for you and your guests

Ingredients:

2 very ripe avocados, 3 tbsps cocoa powder, squeeze of lime juice or more, 3-5 tbsps of organic runny honey (or agave syrup).
For the honeyed strawberries: 200g of strawberries, halved and thickly sliced,1 tbsp of organic runny honey, a good squeeze of lime/lemon juice.

Method :
Combine the strawberries, honey and lemon/lime juice. Cover and leave for 20-30 minutes then, once the juices start to seep out of the berries, stir again an set aside until ready to serve.  Meanwhile, make the mousse, halve the avocadoes, remove the stones, peel , and put the flesh in a food processor. Add the cocoa powder, a good squeeze of lime juice, and 3 tablespoons of honey. Process to a velvety, thick puree, then taste and add more honey or lime juice as you like.
Scoop the mousse into small serving dishes, cover and chill for an hour or so. Serve the honeyed strawberries and their juices spooned on top.

Ultimate post workout Green Smoothie

Post workout smoothie to give you the energy you need for a long day ahead

ingredients :

Blend the following

1 cup of unsweetened almond milk (almond breeze)

1 cup of spinach leaves

1 ripe banana

1 kiwi

1-2 teaspoons of spirulina from organic burst

1/2 cup of ground almonds

top up with ice cubes if you want to or more milk and sprinkle with chia seeds

This recipe is wonderful for energy levels, contains a good content of essential fats , magnesium, iron, potassium, selenium, chromium, copper, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin K and B’s, fibre, vitamin E and prebiotics especially from the kiwi therefore enhancing healthy bacterial growth in the gut. The spirulina has wonderful benefits, it

  • is high in protein (gram for gram, higher than that in animal produce, fish or soybeans)
  • is anti-inflammatory with its content of gamma linolenic acid (beneficial for inflammatory conditions including pre-menstrual syndrome)
  • it has 26 times the amount of calcium found in milk !
  • supports the body’s natural ability to detox,
  • helps to improve the assimilation of nutrients
  • has four times the antioxidant properties of blueberries,
  • an easily absorbable form of iron (great if anaemic;pregnant or suffering from constipation)
  • is incredible for healthy eyes with its high content in vitamin A
  •  and by actively promoting cell regeneration, it helps wounds heal quicker and recovery from illnesses occur faster.It nonetheless boosts the immune system !

 

Enjoy your smoothie

 

Understanding Food Intolerances

Understanding Food Intolerances

Several factors can be the cause of a food intolerance: chemical sensitivities (tartrazine E102), caffeine, sunset yellow- E110) or enzyme deficiencies (lactase enzyme deficiency for instance). Research has also found that food intolerances are linked to IgG antibodies produced by our immune system in response to certain foods. The IgG antibodies recognise and bind to specific food proteins and form immune complexes in the body which may accumulate in certain areas and trigger inflammation (in the joints, respiratory tract, skin).

Even though it may not be life threatening, food intolerances can manifest in an array of unpleasant symptoms which are often left unexplained, affecting your quality of life. The severity/frequency of the symptoms resulting in a food intolerance can depend on how long they have been present for, or could be made worst with a leaky gut (‘leaky gut’ occurs when gaps between the usual tight junctions in the gut form, and there is a loss of control of what passes through the lining of the small intestine, letting those substances to leak into the bloodstream). Conventional therapies or even certain supplements can help the symptoms but may not always prevent the onset.

The onset of the symptoms are delayed and often intermittent and may last for several days or even weeks. Thus making it harder to pin point which particular food or categories of food cause the intolerance.

Common symptoms that may occur singly or in combination may be the cause of food intolerances

  • Bloating
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches or migraine
  • Constipation
  • Skin problems (rashes, acne etc)
  • Weight issues and water retention
  • Anxiety (acute or chronic)
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Arthritis
  • Attention deficit disorder

As a side note:

Coeliac Disease is not a simple food intolerance but an auto-immune disorder caused by permanent intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein that can be found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. Whilst about 45 % of the population suffer from food intolerances, only 2 % of us suffer from allergies. An allergy is an IgE mediated reaction which is a ‘defence mechanism’, when the body ‘s immune system believes that it is being threatened by something harmful and therefore produces an inappropriate response. The severity of the reaction can range from mild to severe, and occur immediately. Common allergens include :peanuts, eggs, sesame, shellfish, latex etc.

The NHS recommends the use of elimination diets, whereby you eliminate several categories of food at once, and slowly re-introduce them back into your diet whilst logging the food and the symptoms they cause or not. The process can be lengthy, frustrating and sadly not provide you with wonderful nutrients you ought to have on a regular basis

Food Intolerance tests can bring you a step ahead of your journey. Using finger prick tests, the blood sample can be sent to the lab and detailed results obtained 7 -10 days. The choice of the number of food (s) you would like to get tested for can range from 40 to 200 and the price varies accordingly. Simple tests using an accurate method can also be done in practice covering up to 59 foods and provide you a very good guide for us to tailor a plan according to your needs

Get in touch and together we can clear your uncertainties, support your diet and lifestyle with the right choices and supplements if required.

Food intolerance and weight gain

Research has also shown a correlation with the formation of IgG immune complexes to form inflammatory substances, called cytokines. Part of the cytokines family, is TNF-alpha , a molecule which has an important role in regulating both sugar and fat metabolism. It also can affect the hormone, leptin which in turn can cause the loss of hunger control, leading to the consumption of excessive portions of food. Unfortunately, to complicate things, TNF-alpha also blocks insulin receptors, promoting insulin resistance which can lead to diabetes. With this correlation in mind, it makes sense to support the diet with an elimination of foods causing an intolerance and provide alternatives to prevent nutritional deficiencies. Overall reducing the cytokines produced and inflammation caused.

Sun dried tomato Hummus

We always have some hummus in our fridge, that we can have as a snack, as an entrée while cooking dinner or as an addition to our packed lunches. Hummus gives you a healthy source of vegetarian protein and is filling enough to keep your hunger at bay before your next meal. It is a great side especially when having a vegetarian meal and hummus is so versatile with the flavours you can add to it. Yes hummus is always available from the supermarket, but why not make your own, with organic ingredients or not, it is  fun and a better option than constantly purchasing it all made up.

Nutritional benefits : High in Manganese for energy production, High in Iron(important for menstruating women, pregnant or lactating women and growing children). Iron has an important role since it forms part of haemoglobin, which transports oxygen from the lungs to all our body cells, and is part of key enzyme systems for energy production and metabolism. Cholesterol lowering; Low Glycaemic index and therefore supports blood glucose levels and can be ideal for any imbalances in hormones or  in pre-diabetic/diabetic states; High in fibre and great for the digestive tract;High in saponins, antioxidants that help us fight against disease and play a role in cancer prevention.

 

Ingredients

2 cups of tinned organic chickpeas

1/3 cup of tahini

4 tablespoons of olive oil

3 small garlic gloves

5-6 sundried tomatoes

1 teaspoon of paprika and a 1 teaspoon of cumin

Maldon sea salt and pepper to taste

squeeze the juice of half a lemon

Method:

Use a hand blender or a food processor to combine all the ingredients. Depending on the consistency you prefer, add more or less lemon or a dash of water. The creaminess can be obtained by varying your tahini and olive oil quantities.

I had a jar of sundried tomatoes and squeezed out the oil, but you may also purchase organic sundried tomatoes from Suma, Infinity foods, Tree of life online.

Healthy and Indulgent Dark Chocolate Brownies

 

These brownies are a beautiful treat to reward yourself after an intense workout, a difficult day or for one of those days where you need some chocolate indulgence. Brownies are often associated with naughtiness but a healthy version of dark chocolate brownies made from scratch is both undoubtedly delicious and decadent. They have no refined sugars and they  contain healthy fats, fibre, protein, and antioxidants like  good quality dark chocolate. I had no dark chocolate in the house last sunday, so used dark organic cocoa powder instead and got them ready for the oven within minutes before the Master Chef finale !

Serves about 15

Time to prep: 10 mins

Time to bake :25-30 minutes

Ingredients :

28 g or about 5 ounces of high quality organic 60-70% cocoa dark chocolate

1/2 of organic coconut oil

2/3 of agave nectar

1/2 cup of ground almonds

A pinch  of maldon sea salt

1/4 cup of gluten free self raising flour or another type of flour you may prefer using

1/4 teaspoon of baking soda

2 organic free range eggs, beaten

1 tablespoon of bourbon vanilla essence

Method :

Preheat your oven to 180-195 degrees Celsius. Line a square baking pan with parchment paper, or spread some coconut oil well with a kitchen towel.Aim for a baking pan of about 8 inch by 8 inch

Melt the dark chocolate and coconut oil in a saucepan over low heat, and stir gently. If using dry cocoa powder, then you can add it to the bowl with the other dry ingredients.

In a mixing bowl, whisk together the agave nectar, almond flour, the gluten-free flour, Maldon sea salt, and baking soda. Make a well in the centre and add the beaten eggs, vanilla extract and melted chocolate mixture. Beat for about under 2 minutes long and allow the batter to come together .At first it will seem like a thin  cake batter but do continue to beat it until it becomes smooth .Spread the mixture evenly in the tray and with a spatula

Add cocoa nibs/ dark chocolate chips to the top of the brownie mix once in the tray, and press in lightly.

Bake in the centre for about 30 mins or until the brownies have set

Cool on a wire rack once ready

Allow to chill for 1 hr before cutting if you wish or have them warm and gooey with a cup of tea

For nutty dark chocolate brownies, add chopped hazelnuts or almonds in the mixture before baking

brownie bake

The wonderful powers of Magnesium

In an ideal world, our daily food consumption should provide us with the necessary organic minerals but a lot of us are deprived of this option not only because of our dietary habits. The intensive use of pesticides and nitrogen based fertilisers therefore means that plants grow fast and artificially, causing a depletion of the magnesium content. This directly affects us, as our health also depends on the fertility of our soil.

Magnesium is involved in about 300 enzymatic body processes that regulate diverse biochemical reactions in the body. These include muscle and nerve function, protein synthesis, blood glucose control, neurotransmitter activity (i.e chemical messengers’ activity in the brain), hormonal balance and blood pressure regulation. It is an abundant mineral and vital for every organ in the body.

Our body contains approximately 25 g of magnesium with 50 to 60 % present in the bones and most of the rest in soft tissues.

 

Magnesium plays a role in the active transport of calcium and potassium ions across our cell membranes, an important process to the conduction of nerve impulses, muscle contraction and a normal heart rhythm. Magnesium contributes to both the strength and formation of bones and teeth, and is required for several processes such as: for energy production (alongside other components); the synthesis of an incredible molecule called glutathione which supports our liver detoxification pathways, and above all it is required for the synthesis of DNA and RNA.

What about plants? Magnesium also has such an important role for photosynthesis! Without it, plants cannot capture the sun’s energy for photosynthesis. The mineral in plants is found in the enzymes, in the heart of the chlorophyll molecule, and the mineral is responsible for providing the leaves their beautiful green colour.

So which foods contain this wonder mineral? Animal and plant sources including wholegrains, nuts and seeds, green leafy vegetables and legumes.

Recent data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey and the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed evidence of daily intakes being much lower than recommended amounts, in particular for magnesium, selenium and potassium. Being deficient in those minerals often leads on to profound cravings which are most commonly satisfied with high intakes of fast and processed foods, sugar and carbohydrates.

Unfortunately magnesium deficiency is one of most pronounced mineral deficiency. The industrial process involved in refining grains strips off the nutrient rich germ and bran, causing a significantly lower magnesium content. Other factors that can deplete us of magnesium, include: alcohol; medications such as diuretics, corticosteroids, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the contraceptive pill, proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole) and antibiotics; ageing, calcium supplements and bisphosphonates. A diet high in saturated fats also causes a reduction of magnesium in the intestines. Conditions which can affect magnesium status include poor digestive health, prolonged stress, poor kidney health, diabetes, heavy periods, irritable bowel disease or Chron’s disease. Intakes high in sugar also promote the excretion of magnesium via the kidneys. Whereas carbonated/fizzy drinks’ content of phosphates, bind to magnesium causing this new molecule to be unstable in the body and therefore having no good use.

On a regular basis, clients unknowingly present physical signs and symptoms of magnesium deficiency. To name but a few: muscle spasms, anxiety, pre-menstrual symptoms related to hormonal imbalances, irritability, arrhythmias (irregular heart beat).Often subclinical symptoms are concealed by the lack of awareness and ability to distinguish the signs of magnesium deficiency from other health conditions/concerns. In particular when it comes to the diagnosis of depression, migraines, chronic fatigue and insomnia.

Beneficial intakes of magnesium have shown to be associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure, which correlates with a lower risk of coronary heart disease. Due to magnesium’s action in the digestive tract, it supports the breakdown of food and the assimilation of nutrients. It also supports the production of hydrochloric acid and bile. It is used commonly for postmenopausal osteoporosis where it supports calcium metabolism and bone formation

Overall, the best ways to obtain magnesium, is consuming it organically bound as we would find in whole foods. Magnesium can also be absorbed through the skin, through the use magnesium salts or magnesium oil. This is also a wonderful way of relaxing the nervous and musculoskeletal system with a bath or foot soak of magnesium salts.

Consulting a nutritional therapist is the best way to understand which form of magnesium may be useful for which symptoms and the therapeutic doses required to address these. It is best not to supplement without an in depth consultation where we delve deeper in what may affect your health status.

The data below was extracted from the ‘Magnesium Fact Sheet (2013) for Health professionals by the US department of Health and Human Sciences.

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Magnesium
Food Milligrams (mg) per serving Percent DV*
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 20
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup 78 20
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 74 19
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup 63 16
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits 61 15
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup 61 15
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup 60 15
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup 50 13
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons 49 12
Bread, whole wheat, 2 slices 46 12
Avocado, cubed, 1 cup 44 11
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces 43 11
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup 42 11
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces 42 11
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium 40 10
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet 36 9
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup 35 9
Banana, 1 medium 32 8
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces 26 7
Milk, 1 cup 24–27 6–7
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 24 6
Raisins, ½ cup 23 6
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces 22 6
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces 20 5
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup 12 3
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup 10 3
Apple, 1 medium 9 2
Carrot, raw, 1 medium 7 2

*DV = Daily Value. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help consumers compare the nutrient contents of products within the context of a total diet. The DV for magnesium is 400 mg for adults and children aged 4 and older. However, the FDA does not require food labels to list magnesium content unless a food has been fortified with this nutrient. Foods providing 20% or more of the DV are considered to be high sources of a nutrient.

Reference for this table of values and information can be found on

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ (accessed on 24/05/2015)

 

 

 

Spirulina Energy Balls

This is a recipe I have adapted and share regularly with clients. It Is low in glycaemic index with the source of sugars from fruits and agave nectar.It can be an ideal snack for you to carry, and has a content of protein and fibre in addition to the superfood ,spirulina.You can use them as a pre-workout snack or if you have a sweet tooth at 4pm. Flaxseeds from the family of lignans, have wonderful properties, supporting a healthy digestive tract and providing support to the endocrine system. They are not only high in ALA, a form of omega 3 fatty acids giving them  anti-inflammatory properties but are also high in anti-oxidants, thus help to protect against  health conditions(such high cholesterol levels, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, cancer)

Ingredients :

1 cup of rolled oats

4 tablespoons of chopped medjool dates

1/4 cup of flaxseeds

1 teaspoon of spirulina powder (Organic burst)

1/2 cup of almond butter (Meridian)

2 teaspoons of melted coconut oil (allowed to cool down before adding to the mixture)

1 tablespoon of agave nectar

Method :

Combine the dates, almond butter, agave nectar and coconut oil in a food processor and pulse until the dates are fully chopped and everything is combined.

In a bowl, mix together oats, flax seeds, spirulina. Then add your date mixture and stir well until fully combined.

Roll into balls.Place the balls in an airtight container and store in the fridge or freezer.